I have 2 Peavey Windsor 100 watt tube heads, bought both of them used. The first one I bought as a backup for my Marshall head, and when that got stolen - which I'm still not over, dammit - I started using the Windsor which lo and behold is awesome for how I use it. Transistor Long Tailed Pair Circuit The long tailed pair is a differential amplifier used as the basis of operational amplifier technology - seen with a transistor here it can also be sued with FETs and vacuum tubes / valves.

The signals on each grid are mixed, and balanced outputs are taken from the anodes. A long-tailed pair usually has a little more output signal swing than a cathodyne using the same valves (but not as much as some 'techs' might suggest), and it has the advantage of providing some gain. Dec 12, 2010 · A cathodyne is a PI that only uses one triode, as opposed to the "standard" long-tailed pair PI that most amps use. With a cathodyne, you're basically using the triode as a regular preamp gain stage (inverting) with a gain of one AND a cathode follower (non-inverting) at the same time. Designing Long-Tail Pairs - The Load Line Approach. General. The Marshall/Fender phase inverter is commonly known as a "long-tail pair", or "Schmitt" type phase inverter, or phase splitter (actually, the original Schmitt inverter was a differential pair with a large "tail" resistor; the "standard" guitar amplifier phase inverter is a self-biased version of this circuit that works better with ... .

This phase inverter used both halves of a 12AX7 to place a driver stage in front of a phase splitter, a configuration that is arguably more a part of “the legendary tweed tone” than the sophisticated long-tailed-pair in the Bassman and high-powered Twin, thanks to its propensity to distort rather early and thicken up the tone in a way we ...

Fender Princeton and Princeton Reverb amps have a split-phase phase inverter that has a gain of 1. A long-tailed pair phase inverter can supply quite a bit of gain, but requires another tube stage. If you're willing to lose the tremolo, the tremolo tube stage can be used to build a long-tailed pair phase inverter. Long Tail Pair. A phase inverter circuit often used in high fi and guitar amplifiers is the long tail pair. This is in current terminology a differential amplifier. The one shown below is a direct coupled version and is a variation of one used in a commercial amplifier that had cathode loaded output stages.

Mar 04, 2019 · An equally significant splash of secret sauce is found in the Princeton Reverb’s phase inverter, which follows the cathodyne (a.k.a. split-load) topology, with one half of a 12AX7 driving the signal while the second half splits it and inverts the phase of one leg to send it on to the dual 6V6GT output tubes.

The Bass 30 uses a cathodyne PI followed by a driver stage on PI output, whereas the Bass 50 uses a standard, class A gain stage followed by a long-tailed pair phase inverter. Thanks to Dave Moylan for pointing this out. These schematics are reproduced from a book of schematics provided by Gibson. The Hiwatt doesn't, it's a "long tailed pair" type, although with sightly different values than the traditional Fender/Marshall version. The cathodyne PI is a simpler type that uses only one valve stage, and derives the two out-of-phase signals from both the plate and cathode - there's a good explanation of how it works here: Creating long tailed pair differential amplifier using NPN vs PNP The long tailed pair is the basis for differnetial amplifier and its first stage. I have usually seen it constructed using pair of NPN transistors in common emitter configuration with their emitters feeding into a single emitter resistor.

Later, Fender employed the cathodyne style in small-to-medium amps like the Deluxe, Pro, Bandmaster, and Super. Larger amps like the Bassman and the Twin use the long-tailed-pair inverter. Each style has its own sound — the long-tailed-pair has a smoother, more controlled overdrive than the cathodyne style, which can be wonderfully raw and ... A phase inverter circuit often used in high fi and guitar amplifiers in the 1950s and 1960s is the long tail pair. This is in current terminology a differential amplifier. The one shown below is a direct coupled version and is a variation of one used in a commercial amplifier that had cathode loaded output stages.

In this era Fender experimented with different amplifier designs cathode vs . fixed bias, paraphase vs . cathodyne vs . long-tailed pair phase inverters, octal vs . 9-pin preamp tubes, feedback loops and filter chokes. Update: May 2018. The Bassman Micro LTP layout and schematic were added. Using a Long Tail Pair phase inverter instead of a cathodyne allows the addition of a true 5F6A negative feedback loop and presence control. The overdrive tone is also more 5F6A authentic. In discrete electronics, a common arrangement for implementing a differential amplifier is the long-tailed pair, which is also usually found as the differential element in most op-amp integrated circuits. A long-tailed pair can be used as an analog multiplier with the differential voltage as one input and the biasing current as another. The cathodyne was the first phase-inverter circuit I got to know, and that was in junior high in the early 1960's. I knocked together a couple or three experimental pastiche chassis using it, and it's a neat and economical design, but I gravitated to the "long-tailed pair" design thereafter, and I've stayed with that design since. Long tail vs cathodyne phase inversion... in non-technical terms. Discussion in 'Amp Tech Center' started by Che_Guitarra, Nov 9, 2017. Nov 9, 2017 ... This phase inverter used both halves of a 12AX7 to place a driver stage in front of a phase splitter, a configuration that is arguably more a part of “the legendary tweed tone” than the sophisticated long-tailed-pair in the Bassman and high-powered Twin, thanks to its propensity to distort rather early and thicken up the tone in a way we ...

Phase Splitters In a push-pull amp, you need a phase splitter to produce the two identical but in phase opposition signals to drive the power tubes. Phase splitters are like religions, you belong to one or another and discussions between fans are often emotional.

A phase inverter circuit often used in high fi and guitar amplifiers in the 1950s and 1960s is the long tail pair. This is in current terminology a differential amplifier. The one shown below is a direct coupled version and is a variation of one used in a commercial amplifier that had cathode loaded output stages. Based on Valve Wizard's description of the Long Tail Pair Phase Inverter I have come up with following for my design. Start with a 12AX7 for the tube. I believe that is what Marshall uses. I assume the voltage will be around 300V after filter caps, choke, voltage dropping resistors. Apr 13, 2019 · Long-Tailed Pair - Comparator and Differential Amplifier - Simply Put ... Back to Basics: the differential amplifier, aka long-tailed pair, diff-pair - Duration: 20:54. w2aew 59,223 ...

Long Tail Pair. A phase inverter circuit often used in high fi and guitar amplifiers is the long tail pair. This is in current terminology a differential amplifier. The one shown below is a direct coupled version and is a variation of one used in a commercial amplifier that had cathode loaded output stages. After posting that 14GW8 SE idea it occurred to me it might also be a good tradeoff on a Princely Pauper. It's 4 bucks, vs a buck each for the 'dollar days' version, but has a triode, which saves a tube and it's socket, and trimming the bias down a smidgen at 250V B+ gets it just inside an $11 Triad 50 VA N-68X.

Fender Princeton and Princeton Reverb amps have a split-phase phase inverter that has a gain of 1. A long-tailed pair phase inverter can supply quite a bit of gain, but requires another tube stage. If you're willing to lose the tremolo, the tremolo tube stage can be used to build a long-tailed pair phase inverter. Fender Princeton and Princeton Reverb amps have a split-phase phase inverter that has a gain of 1. A long-tailed pair phase inverter can supply quite a bit of gain, but requires another tube stage. If you're willing to lose the tremolo, the tremolo tube stage can be used to build a long-tailed pair phase inverter.

Can't say I've heard one, but many technicians like the "long tailed pair" phase splitter as opposed to the Dynaco ST-70's "cathodyne" phase splitter. (Not meaning to stir up trouble with the Dynaco crowd) Also some Eico amps (I don't know which models) came with Acrosound ouput transformers which is a very good transformer.

Creating long tailed pair differential amplifier using NPN vs PNP The long tailed pair is the basis for differnetial amplifier and its first stage. I have usually seen it constructed using pair of NPN transistors in common emitter configuration with their emitters feeding into a single emitter resistor.

With the Plexi models of the late '60s and others that followed, Marshall changed a few details in the preamp to make the amp brighter, as well as making a few other alterations (eventually dropping the tube rectifier too), but a good 85 percent or so of the circuit remained easily traceable to the original Fender 5F6A schematic, including ... The Marshall/Fender phase inverter is commonly known as a "long-tail pair", or "Schmitt" type phase inverter, or phase splitter (actually, the original Schmitt inverter was a differential pair with a large "tail" resistor; the "standard" guitar amplifier phase inverter is a self-biased version of this circuit that works better with positive-only ... Mar 04, 2019 · An equally significant splash of secret sauce is found in the Princeton Reverb’s phase inverter, which follows the cathodyne (a.k.a. split-load) topology, with one half of a 12AX7 driving the signal while the second half splits it and inverts the phase of one leg to send it on to the dual 6V6GT output tubes. The most standard type of phase inverter is called a "long tailed pair" which lends itself to a more controlled imbalance of the way the power tubes get driven. On the other hand, amps like a 5E3, Tweed Deluxe use what's called a "cathodyne" phase inverter that only uses one triode, but drives one power tube from the plate and the other from ...

Based on Valve Wizard's description of the Long Tail Pair Phase Inverter I have come up with following for my design. Start with a 12AX7 for the tube. I believe that is what Marshall uses. I assume the voltage will be around 300V after filter caps, choke, voltage dropping resistors. Re: Long tail pair or cathodyne? I'm sure TJ has some good input on cathodyne vs. long tail. My $0.02 is that all things being equal, the long tail is punchier and more agressive. The Bass 30 uses a cathodyne PI followed by a driver stage on PI output, whereas the Bass 50 uses a standard, class A gain stage followed by a long-tailed pair phase inverter. Thanks to Dave Moylan for pointing this out. These schematics are reproduced from a book of schematics provided by Gibson. Book Description. Our new book applies 21st-Century technology to the design of guitar amplifier preamps, power amps, and power supplies. Computer-based visualization replaces the traditional litany of mathematical formulas.

I was in the process of trying to understand if installing the larMar type PPIMV in a cathodyne amp would have to be different than in a long tail pair PI. I also considered trying the single pot MV like you shared for use in the 6A14 .

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The Hiwatt doesn't, it's a "long tailed pair" type, although with sightly different values than the traditional Fender/Marshall version. The cathodyne PI is a simpler type that uses only one valve stage, and derives the two out-of-phase signals from both the plate and cathode - there's a good explanation of how it works here:

Update: May 2018. The Bassman Micro LTP layout and schematic were added. Using a Long Tail Pair phase inverter instead of a cathodyne allows the addition of a true 5F6A negative feedback loop and presence control. The overdrive tone is also more 5F6A authentic.

The phase inverter can use various circuits, and the gain of this position in the circuit can vary from less than 1 (split-load/cathodyne inverter by itself) to ~1/4 of Mu (long-tail pair, as used in most amps) to ~1/2 Mu (paraphase inverter, but just the first triode; second should have "no gain" or roughly the same result as the long-tail ...

The most standard type of phase inverter is called a "long tailed pair" which lends itself to a more controlled imbalance of the way the power tubes get driven. On the other hand, amps like a 5E3, Tweed Deluxe use what's called a "cathodyne" phase inverter that only uses one triode, but drives one power tube from the plate and the other from ...

The Bass 30 uses a cathodyne PI followed by a driver stage on PI output, whereas the Bass 50 uses a standard, class A gain stage followed by a long-tailed pair phase inverter. Thanks to Dave Moylan for pointing this out. These schematics are reproduced from a book of schematics provided by Gibson.

Re: Long tail pair or cathodyne? I'm sure TJ has some good input on cathodyne vs. long tail. My $0.02 is that all things being equal, the long tail is punchier and more agressive.

The Marshall/Fender phase inverter is commonly known as a "long-tail pair", or "Schmitt" type phase inverter, or phase splitter (actually, the original Schmitt inverter was a differential pair with a large "tail" resistor; the "standard" guitar amplifier phase inverter is a self-biased version of this circuit that works better with positive-only ...

The phase inverter can use various circuits, and the gain of this position in the circuit can vary from less than 1 (split-load/cathodyne inverter by itself) to ~1/4 of Mu (long-tail pair, as used in most amps) to ~1/2 Mu (paraphase inverter, but just the first triode; second should have "no gain" or roughly the same result as the long-tail ... Apr 13, 2019 · Long-Tailed Pair - Comparator and Differential Amplifier - Simply Put ... Back to Basics: the differential amplifier, aka long-tailed pair, diff-pair - Duration: 20:54. w2aew 59,223 ... .

The long tail pair is more complicated and requires two triode stages. It allows for more fine tuning options in the design process which becomes critical as amplifiers get bigger and louder. Large high power tube amps can be built with a cathodyne phase inverter, but since the introduction of the tweed era bassman they are quite rare. Phase Splitters In a push-pull amp, you need a phase splitter to produce the two identical but in phase opposition signals to drive the power tubes. Phase splitters are like religions, you belong to one or another and discussions between fans are often emotional.